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nonfiction by John T. Cullen

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1892 Gaslamp Era True Crime National Scandal Why did the Beautiful Stranger Die so Violently?

Clocktower Books, a San Diego Small Press, pioneering in online and e-book publishing, has released titles since 1996. Visit Galley City (mainstream fiction) or Galley City Nonfiction. John T. Cullen has authored over 40 novels plus poetry and shorts. His nonfiction spans History, Science, and many other topics of pressing interest: he knows how to pick them (a growing collection of fascinating articles by a free thinker & diligent researcher).

True Crime 1892 Gaslamp Era Mystery Thanksgiving Day 24 November 1892, the Beautiful Stranger checked into the luxury resort Hotel del Coronado under false I.D. and never checked out alive. She died of a gunshot to the head during a great sea storm. Her case became a national sensation and enduring ghost legend. Enigma solved at last: 2 books in one: Dead Move (nonfiction, scholarly analysis); Lethal Journey (fictional dramatization based on the analysis): Coronado Mystery.


Teenage Author

Teenage Poet

teenage poet - over 425 poems and one novel read free at Galley City link at Summer Planets

Teenage Novelist

teenage poet - over 425 poems and one novel read free at Galley City link at Summer Planets

click to visit Coronado page at Galley CityCoronado Mystery

Notorious 1892 True Crime/Famous Ghost Legend

Three Books: Dead Move (nonfiction)

click to start reading half the novel at Galley CityTrue Crime and Ghost Legend: Beautiful Stranger. The story of the Beautiful Stranger at the Hotel del Coronado, across the bay from San Diego, is arguably the strongest ghost legend in the area. On Thanksgiving Day 1892, a stunning young woman, traveling alone, registered at the Hotel Del under the phony name Lottie A. Bernard. After five days of acting increasingly strangely, she was found dead of a gunshot to the head on the back steps of the hotel, following a literally dark and stormy night of raging wind and ocean waves. Her story was immediately picked up by the Yellow Press of the day, and became a national sensation on the internet of the times: the telegraph. Until I published Dead Move, nobody had a clue who she was, or why she died. Rumors of scandalous affairs with men in high places abounded. The nation was breathless. The death certificate, oddly, has two names on it, and other mysteries abound. Time passed, and she is remembered only as the famous ghost of Room 3327 (originally Room 302) in the Hotel Del.

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